About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
MSNBC 30
KNTV (NBC) 3
KPIX (CBS) 2
WJZ (CBS) 2
CNN 1
KGO (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 47
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
, it's "meet the press." >>> wall of destruction, the death toll soars from japan's twin disasters as authorities race to head off nuclear meltdowns. >>> shock waves, the situation in japan raises fears over the safety of nuclear power plants here at home. >>> and whiteout, a late winter blizzard leaves hundreds of motorists stranded in north dakota. >>> good morning, those stories and more straight ahead, this is first look on msnbc. >>> and we begin this morning with a country in crisis, in japan this morning, rescuers are searching for signs of life beneath the rubble as the clock ticks in the wake of friday's epic disaster. japanese please say they've recovered another 1,000 bodies that washed ashore along the miyagi coast, rising a mounting death toll that is believed to be above 10,000, nbc's kristen dahlgren joins us from tokyo with more. >> reporter: there have been more than 300 aftershocks registered here there were new warnings today. and now growing concerns over the possibility of a nuclear accident. with heavy equipment, and bare hands, rescue workers continue the des
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
'm bill hemmer. welcome back, alisyn. alisyn: i'mal lynn cam rata in for martha. >> northern japan was hit by a massive magnitude 9.0 earthquake. i feel deep in my heart as i see the conditions in the affected area. i'm concerned about the nuclear situation because it's unpredictable. with the help of those involved i hope things will not get worse. bill report emperor is in his as it and he's rarely seen on television. show you where we are right now. northeast of tokyo, 200 miles, the fukushima plant in an animation we put together to show you what's happening on the inside as it runs north to the south. you will see the four reactors at this plants in question. there were 6 reactors under consideration but for sake of this purpose we'll show you reactor number 1, 3, and 4. 1, 2, 3 were online when the quake and same rolled through. number 4 was offline. about it was rolling with spent nuclear fuel. then we can show you where we are today. that's what they looked like 7 days ago. on this map here, this was taken two days ago. the four reactors are on the screen. this is number 4, and num
. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 point. it mentioned it opened down nearly 300 points earlier. today one of the biggest aftershocks to hit japan s
>>> right now on "andrea mitchell reports," president obama promising full support to japan as it tries to avert nuclear disaster and cope with the unfolding humanitarian crisis in wake of friday's deadly quake. this hour, can a nuclear meltdown be avoided? engineers are more troubled today than ever about that crippled nuclear react or. we talk with congressman ed markey sounding the alarm for stricter safeguards. >>> experts say the big one is coming to california. are the officials there ready. >>> in libya gadhafi forces expand strikes against rebels on the front. secretary of state hillary clinton arrives in paris to talk with european counterparts about imposing a no-fly zone. >>> labor fight. is the challenge over bargaining rights about to head to court? >>> i'm norah o'donnell live in washington. andrea is on assignment. we begin in japan where the humanitarian disaster is compounded by the potential for a nuclear nightmare. 250,000 doses of iodine are being distributed to evacuees as a defense to radiation. it follows explosions at two nuclear reactors, a third is
in that country. stocks continue to teeter, could japan's economy cause the u.s. to stumble? we'll look into that. moments ago, a new after shock described by our msnbc team in tokyo as huge and lasting a long time here, we'll hear from chris jansing on that in a home. the threat of a nuclear catastrophe still surrounds japan and a cloud of fear here. the world is watching closely those nuclear reactors at the fukushima plant. 50 workers were ordered out when things got dicey. now they're going back in at great personal risk to try and figure out how to get a handle on things. fires, explosions, and radiation leaks remain a constant threat. it seems no one can predict how this situation will end. the u.s. army trying to ramp up its humanitarian effort to help the people of japan. more than 10,000 people already listed missing or dead. half a million have been evacuated and the cost of the destruction could top $100 billion. the sato family was lucky enough to survive. but when they were returned to their neighborhood, they found there is nothing left for them, their entire town is destroyed, gone
and worsening nuclear crisis in japan. another explosion rocked the fukushima nuclear power plant that is about 170 miles north of tokyo. and it is now feared a third reactor will explode. officials say fuel rods appear to be melting right now in all three troubled reactors. all of this, of course, raising concerns more radiation will be released. the u.s. military moves some of its fleet further from japan's shore after some of the uss ronald reagan carrier group were exposed to a cloud of low-level radiation, this as authorities try to cope with the disaster. officials say another 1,000 bodies washed up today along japan's earthquake and tsunami ravaged northeast coast. so far 2,800 people confirmed dead. but as you well know by now, the final death toll is expected to increase to as many as possibly 10,000 the people. chris jansing joins us live from tokyo regarding the nuclear crisis. at the top of the hour i pointed out a japanese official is saying we are likely seeing melting at the plant that's been so much focused on. >> reporter: what we've had is for a second time a fuel rod explode
official here in the united states says that the primary containment structure of those reactors in japan, it looks like has breached. it raises the risk now of a further release of radioactive material. let's go right to tokyo now. msnbc chris jansing is standing by. i received a note the winds have shifted and are blowing over the pacific sxnt over tokyo. i'm sure people there are very concerned. >> reporter: it's been a very concerning situation because there have been levels, low levels i need to emphasize that of radiation here in tokyo. it has caused enough of a red flag that the french government has advised its citizens to leave the capital. the austrian government is moving its embassy here to osaka. u.s. embassy officials nbc news has learned had a meeting earlier today with folks who work there, with their families to try to elay some of the concerns of americans living here in tokyo. it has been confirmed for us. we talked to people involved in the meeting that several people stood up and said, should i stay or should i go? that is the question a lot of people, especially peop
on the mounting nuclear crisis in japan, authorizing the first evacuations of american government employees out of the country. in addition, the state department is warning all u.s. citizens to consider leaving japan. the unpredictable weather conditions risks spreading radioactive material. that move comes as japanese crews and military helicopters brave radiation to dump sea water on to the stricken fukushima complex. the tactics are an attempt to cool overheated radium fuel that may be on the verge of spewing out more radiation. meanwhile, plant operators say they're racing to finish a new power line that could restore cooling systems and ease the crisis. still, the top u.s. nuclear regulatory official is warning american citizens within 50 miles of the complex to leave the area or at least remain indoors. testifying on capitol hill yesterday that the situation is "very serious." >> we believe that there is no water in the spent fuel pool known as number four. i would say that it is my great hope that the information that we have is not accurate. i would hope for the sake of everyone that th
unbelievable stories of survival. those are coming out of japan. we'll share them with you. >>> plus, what do you do if you share the house speaker's trademarked orange glow? if you're like this guy, you become a john boehner impersonator and hope you can learn to cry on cue. more coming up later. >>> first, we want to get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. here at 30 rock in new york city. just four days after suffering its most devastating natural disaster ever, japan is now potentially facing the worst nuclear accident since chernobyl. in total, there are 17 nuclear power plants across that country. this crisis largely centers around one complex. it's about 170 miles northeast of tokyo. the crippled fukushima power plant. high levels of radiation leaked from the facility this morning after a third reactor was rocked by an explosion and a fourth caught fire. in a brief address to that nation today, the country's prime minister urged calm but said there was a "very high risk of further leakage." after an emergency cabinet meeting, the japanese cabinet warned 140,000 people living within roughly 1
>> couric: tonight, from the air and from the ground, japan launches a water assault on those damaged nuclear reactors to try to cool them. and a voluntary evacuation of americans is under way. i'm katie couric. also tonight, president obama tries to reassure this country we are safe. >> we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the west coast. >> couric: libya's moammar qaddafi vows to retake all rebel-held territory as the u.n. considers military action to stop him. and from hiroshima to fukushima, her fear that japan is on the verge of another nuclear catastrophe. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. there is so much concern in this country about nuclear radiation from jay japan that president obama went on national television today to try to calm every down. he said he does not expect harmful levels of radiation from those damaged reactors to reach hawaii, alaska, or the west coast. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americ
libyahrain, two wars and japan all facing problems and the president's responses are getting both praise and criticism. >>> you've seen it, you felt it, gas, food, cars, prices all going up and there's a price record that's hit a three-decade record, but could it be good? >>> how much would you pay for this red tibetan mastiff, i have a hint. he's the most expensive dog in the world. i'm in for chris jansing. the united states is evacuating the citizens that want to leave japan. a united nations forecast showing a possible radioactive plume hitting southern california tomorrow. u.s. officials insist people in japan could stay 50 miles away from the fukushima daiichi plant, much farther away than what the japanese government is telling its own people. helicopters once again scrambling to dump seawater onto this complex, and at the same time workers are racing to finish building a new power line that could restart the cooling system and thus give the relief to the overheating nuclear rods that everybody has been watching. officially the death toll now stands at more than 5y 300, abo
in japan isç "out o control." meantime, u.s. forces operating in that country are being moved even further away from the power plant for safety. a live report from tokyo straight ahead. plus police and protesters face off in pakistan just hours after reports that the u.s. paid more than $2 million for the release of a cia contractor accused of murder. new comments on the situation from the secretary of state. >>> and he reached out online to people he never met in person convincing them to kill themselves. now a judge says the minnesota man in this picture must go to jail. >> it's not fair. it's not fair. >>> a push to rally in michigan. protesters still at odds with the state's governor over the budget join forces at the state capital. the latest in the on going standoff between public union workers in this country and some republican lawmakers. >>> i'm tamron hall. "news nation" is following new details on the nuclear crisis in japan. the secretary-general of the international atomic energy association says he's headed to japan as soon as possible as workers at the fukushima plant strugg
ideas, but they are specific things. and wh) you heard people saying what's happening in japan so far is worse than three mile island, but not as bad as chernobyl, well, okay. it is good to understand that, but it is also good to understand that there's a lot of room between the consequences of three mile island and chernobyl. not just the magnitude and type of accidents themselves, but the consequences of those accidents. how much radioactivity was released, and what it did to people. the on-going crisis in japan is about trying to minimize the amount of radiation that's going to be released from the reactors at daiichi. understanding the difference between this disaster and previous nuclear disasters is empirical. it is understandable even if you're not a physicist. i certainly am not. we have six reactors in japan together at daiichi. three of them, numbers one, two, and three were on, were producing power when the earthquake hit. they automatically shut down, now it has been a matter of keeping enough water flowing into the cooling systems of the reactors to keep the hot radioacti
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another 1,000 bodies washed up along japan's earthquake and tsunami-ravaged coast, as the nuclear crisis deepens, with a new explosion at an already damaged power plant. ann curry reports live from the region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, march 14, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> the images continue to haunt us all. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. japan's prime minister calling this the gravest crisis in his country since world war ii. >> the death toll is now estimated at 10,000. that's expected to climb. so far, about 2,800 people are confirmed dead including those 1,000 bodies discovered overnight. meanwhile, 11 workers have been injured during a second hydrogen explosion today at the fukushima nuclear plant and the u.s. military shifted some of the fleet further away from shore after military personnel were exposed to low level radiation. the state department is warning americans
spread to other parts of japan. it does not appear that it poses any threat to either hawaii or territories or the rest of the united states. >>> andrea mitchell just sat down with secretary of state hillary clinton in cairo. what she says about the crisis in japan, the wave of revolutions in the middle east and her surprise stop today in tahrir square. >> it's very exciting and very moving. and to see where this revolution happened and all that it has meantç to the world is extraordinary for me. >>> also this hour, our exclusive with senator kirsten gillibrand. what she's calling on the president to do in terms of ending the war in afghanistan. >>> good day, everybody, i'm nora o'donnell live in washington. andrea's completed interview is straight ahead. >>> we begin with japan. first the human toll. six days after the quake and tsunami, the official figures stand at 4,164 dead. 7,843 missing. the total now more than 12,000. at the fukushima nuclear plant, workers are desperately trying to cool the reactors. two reactors are believed to have been damaged. two more are at r
of radiation move south. this as japan's emperor makes a rare appearance on tv to mourn the losses and praise the relief efforts. and the list of the dead and missing is growing, now topping 11,000, "early" this wednesday missing is growing, now topping 11,000, "early" this wednesday morning, march 16th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good morning. you are looking at pictures of what so much of the world is focused on this morning. and that is that nuclear plant in fukushima, as we monitor the situation, which is fluid, is probably putting it mildly. >> every hour there's a new development there, as the people at fukushima, at this nuclear reactor, are doing all they can to contain a full-scale nuclear emergency right now. we keep hearing the stories of now being called the faceless 50. 50 employees or so that are basically evacuated and moved back in. the last 50 that are really there to avert a massive nuclear disaster. now we wonder if these poor people are really kind of paying with their lives. what is the situation like. >> and looking at the last line of defense and how much lo
tougher attacks if he did nothing. >>> regulators in japan ignored safety warnings in one reactor and botched insus, are we competent the inspection system in this country is any better? >>> donald trump foreign policy. cheat moammar gadhafi out of his money. >>> we start with a deepening crisis in libya. nbc news chief correspondent richard engel standing by in benghazi, libya. the latest on theç ground. yesterday are you were pessimistic about the rebel force. some who have military training aren't using it. any better sign of their ability to move on tripoli today? >> reporter: no, still they are untrained and they don't have the capability to really take territory. this is something that the rebels themselves realize. i was speaking with some of the leaders of this revolt tonight and they were quite despondent. they are starting to look for outside help. they want military advisors on the ground from the united states. they said they are willing to hire them if necessary. but they recognize that if they don't get their acts together they are not going to be able to advance t
and frayed nerves. the latest from japan. how is the radiation in that country now different from what you absorb every day? and they put the squeeze on pro-democracy demonstrators and a look at where the obama administration stands. live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." i'm bret baier. the news from japan continues to be mostly bad. but there was a positive note today, as the owner of the crippled nuclear plant says the new power line is almost done that will enable the restart of electric powered pumps and possibly a solution to the overheating crisis. elevated radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true, the rods could get hotter and hotter and meltdown and shower
>>> good morning. breaking news. japan's nuclear crisis takes a dire turn. high levels of radiation spewing from the damaged nuclear plant following an explosion at a third reactor and a fire in a fourth. a company official calls it a very bad scenario, and the new concerns have the dow plummeting sharply today, tuesday, march concerns have the dow plummeting sharply today, tuesday, march 15th, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this tuesday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm matt lauer, there doesn't seem to be any more question about it. officials in japan are saying the radiation leaking from the crippled nuclear power plant is enough to impact human health. >> the biggest concern right now is the number 2 reactor which exploded on monday sending more radiation into the air and then a fire at reactor 4 broke out. that reactor had been shut down for maintenance before the quake. all but 50 employees of the plant have been evacuated. in a nationally televised address japan's prime minister urged anyone living near the plant who had not a
. frightening moments for some workers at that troubled nuclear power plant in japan. what made them flee for their lives. >>> searching for spring. unseasonably cold weather puts a chill on the cherry blossoms and many areas of this country. >>> and summer breeze. why it might be a whole lot easier to find a summer job in twlechbt. >>> good morning, everyone, i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc sunday." let's get to what's happening right now beginning with new this morning. robert gates says the obama administration has no plans to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's somet
now go to anderson cooper with "ac 360" live from japan. >>> piers, it is truly an extraordinary development to find somebody alive eight days, particularly remarkable when you consider so many of the injuries and the deaths we've seen were caused by that tsunami with all that debris and fast moving water. remarkable that this person apparently survived that long. and also with freezing cold temperatures at night. we'll try to find out more details on that. also the latest on the nuclear emergency that is ongoing right now. in the fukushima daiichi plant. the latest information on that is that the japanese government is finally admitting that the situation has indeed been worse than previously acknowledged. the government giving a grimmer assessment of the disaster, raising the threat level to level five out of seven, conceding it is worse than they previously said, something america's top nuclear regulator has been saying for two days. the wind had been blowing out to sea. it is now blowing on shore. we'll tell you what that means for cities like tokyo. according to "the new yor
: now to japan. a u.n. expert says radiation continues to leak from those damaged nuclear reactors but progress is being made. all six reactors are now hooked up to power lines-- a step toward getting the cooling systems working once the electricity is turned on the number of workers at the plant is now up to a thousand. meanwhile, the official death toll from the earthquake and tsunami is approaching 10,000 with nearly 14,000 missing. more than a quarter million survivors have no homes or have been forced to leave them. from japan tonight, here's lucy craft. >> reporter: cardboard houses now home for thousands living on the floor of a sports arena outside tokyo. all survived the tsunami and quake only to be caught up in a radiation scare. this fifth grader says "we escaped to my school but when they said even that was not safe, we came here." natives of iwaki like to boast about its postcard scenery and mild climate. the now notorious fukushima nuclear plant only 30 miles away has triggered a mass exodus. "from all sides everyone kept telling us get out of here" says this beautici
america. >>> in japan, new problems at the country's crippled nuclear complex are overshadowing some success at cooling the plant's overheated reactors over the weekend. there had been some optimism. this morning, workers at the facility were evacuated after gray smoke rose from the spent storage pool at the plant's number three reactor. it development comes after officials said they had successfully restored water pumps to two other reactors, putting them under control in a state known as a cold shutdown. the crisis, far from over with the discovery of radiation-tainted vegetables and tap water adding to public fears about contaminated food and drink. all that as officials now predict the death toll there in japan will exceed 18,000 from the earthquake and tsunami that followed. the situation in japan has raised questions in the u.s. energy secretary steven chu weighed in on a controversial nuclear reactor in new york city. >> we'll have to look at weather the reactor should remain. again, i don't want to jump to some judgment about what we should do going forward. the nrc will be l
in radiation drives out the last line of defense, as another fire flares up at japan's crippled nuclear plant. >>> and the fukushima 50. new details this morning about the heroic team, facing death, working inside the scariest place on earth. even helicopters sent to spray the plant, turned back because of the danger as major aftershocks shake tokyo. >>> could the meltdown happen here? "gma" takes you inside an american working plant, to show what the workers face every day. >>. >>> and the run on medicine back home. the rush to buy iodine pills and radiation detecters. but just how worried should we be? >>> and good morning, america. an incredible story unfolding at that nuclear plant. the workers pulled out overnight, because of radiation levels. and they're standing by to go back in at this very hour, likely exposing themselves to so much more radiation. >> just to give a sense of how much risk they are facing, back to the chernobyl disaster. almost 50 of the workers there sacrificed their lives. more than 100 had radiation illness. since you all went to sleep, h
. we find ourselves with the world's most under reported story, a massive humanitarian crisis in japan caused by the quake and the following tsunami. what we could all be doing to help. dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. her morning begins with arthritis pain. that's a coffee and two pills. the afternoon tour begins with more pain and more pills. the evening guests arrive. back to sore knees. back to more pills. the day is done but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. just 2 pills can keep arthritis pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is lara who chose 2 aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief of aleve in liquid gels. and fewer pills for a day free of pain. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [ male announcer ] when you have plaque psoria
cuisinart. >> caught on air, disaster in japan, 11:00 p.m. eastern eastern on msnbc. you can have the last word online at our blog, and follow my tweets at lawrence. "the rachel maddow show" is up next. sitting in tonight, chris haze. good evening. >> good evening. thank you for staying with us the next hour. rachel has the night off. >>> the nuclear crisis in japan is still volatile tonight. there have been numerous developments today. we'll get to those shortly. we begin with something you should never have to ask, something that should never be a question. are we at war? yes, we are at war in iraq and afghanistan, and maybe sort of in pakistan as well. but are we at war again in another middle eastern country? it is not a provocative rhetorical question, it is one so-called no fly zone over libya and to take all necessary measures to protect civilians under attack. faced with threat from moammar gadhafi of a massacre of his own civilians, united nations approved military action against libya, which is a big fricking deal. for us, for the united nations, for the region. yet what
. the nuclear crisis in japan taking a new and potentially dangerous turn today. japan's nuclear safety agency warning the situation at the quake-damaged reactor, that it may not be under control. japanese engineers considering a last-ditch effort to prevent a full-scale meltdown. the government is calling it a race against time to prevent a cat traffic radiation leak that could affect millions of people. priority one, cooling the overheating fuel rods, trying to prevent a massive radiation leak. that may run into problems as well. trace gallagher has more. trace? >> reporter: experts have been saying for days that japan has been downplaying the severity of the crisis. they've upped the crisis from a four to a five. the country is saying they're overwhelmed and calling for the united states to help them stop this crisis. they've gotten some power to reactor 2. the hope is, they can use that power to turn on the cooling pump to get cool water on the reactors and spent fuel rods, but there's a problem. the l.a. times is reporting that nuclear regulatory commission believes the pool holding the s
>>> good morning. breaking news. a surge in radiation levels at the crippled nuclear plant in japan forces emergency crews to evacuate overnight. while they are now getting back to work, there are new fears that those 50 heroic workers could be running out of options today, wednesday, march 16, 2011. r captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a wednesday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> good morning, everyone. i'm savannah guthrie. meredith is on assignment. you just think about the pressure those workers must be under, the sacrifice they may be making. they are being dubbed the fukushima 50, one of the last lines of defense against an all-out meltdown. >> imagine the concern when they were temporarily pulled from the plant overnight after radiation levels spiked for a short term. another concern, the second fire reactor number four today, where spent fuel rods are being stored. >> in a rare appearance, japan's emperor delivered a televised address saying he was, quote, deeply worried, but urged people not to give up hope. we are going to have
bargaining law from taking effect and nuclear fallout from japan gets an upgrade. live from our studio in washington is special report. >> brett: u.s. ambassador susan rice says muammar khadafy is in violation of resolution that demanded a cease-fire in libya. they called on khadafy to halt military attacks on civilians and if the libyan leader does not stand down, the u.s. will launch military action against him. but he said the summit will not send ground troops into the country. we have team coverage. doug is at the pentagon with the u.s. role and logistics of implementing a no-fly zone. we begin with senior correspondent with rick leventhal who is live in libya in benghazi. >> reporter: it's safe to say that we've seen more check points popping up, more young men with small arms and concern about khadafy's army with libyan official on live television saying that the army was actually on the outskirts of this city, but was not planning to come in. this after reports that the cease-fire was followed by heavier fire from khadafy's army against civilians and soldiers rebel fighters. we
's happening. fallout, more traces of radiation found in america from that crippled nuclear plan in japan. is the threat to the u.s. and the world growing? murderous attacksing libyan forces answer president obama's address with a new round of attacks on civilians, according to the rebels. >>> and camelot, it's not. the new miniseries on jfk and jackie o., many historians say it's more fiction than fact. we speak to the producer 0 of the series ahead. >>> good afternoon. we begin with the disaster in japan where the prime minister says the country is in a stalts of maximum alert, this as the fukushima crisis worsens. japan officials have said they believe there's been a partial meltdown at three of the plants' six reactors, that's half. now today radioactive water has been discovered in the maintenance tunnel at the plant. in a a spatefrtepha fr l io ocns e nd ncte peltoeer he nnoced 2 etrothor nd, stonrm plonm seepifr the damaged nuclear power plant into the soil outside the facility. plutonium is years. but so far, officials claim the levels found are not harmful to human health. meanw
concerns about drinking water in japan. the government warning radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant has made tap water unsafe for babies. the u.s. air force bringing in more supplies to help with recovery operations there. >> the military is -- we are here to try and help people. this is a national disaster. we are here to work with the japanese people to start reconstruction and get sendai and other parts of japan's feet on the ground again. bill: the american relief effort includes 13,000 personnel, 20 ships and 140 aircraft. k.t. macfarland said the u.s. military is the first responders to the world. we found that in japan. heather: in the state of nevada, it has the largest share of illegal workers in the country. it also has the highest unemployment rate at 14%. are the illegals making a bad situation worse? anita vogel is joining us from los angeles. tell us about this new report. >> reporter: good morning. it lists the top states with the highest share of illegal immigrants in the labor pool. you mentioned nevada was the number one state with a 10% share of illegal immi
and bradley manning to the obvious. japan. how officials there ignored alarms about the possibility of a massive quake setting off a nuclear crisis that go back years. are these black swans that keep befalling us truly as unforeseen as everyone would want us to believe? how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com. plus, get the best deal or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. >>> turning our attention to japan, setbacks at the fukushima nuclear plant there. smoke started rising from reactor three amid fresh concerns about food and water supplies in the area. residents being warned not to drink the tap water and the government has banned shipments of milk and spinach from the region after radiation was detected but could all of this have been prevented? this man had been warnin
gadhafi actually survive? >>> plus a top nuclear scientist says the disaster over in japan reminds us over here that the nuclear industry over here in the united states has gained control of the agency, which is supposed to regulate it. the nuclear regulatory commission. in other words, in the nrc, the foxes are guarding the hen house. how do we fix this baby? >>> and the juiciest story of the day for "hardball." it's now likely that michelle bauchmann will launch a exploratory committee. but she says she hasn't decided whether or not to run or not for the president. when was the last time anybody watch canning remember someone forming an exploratory committee running for president and not actually running? by the way, didn't we create her here? let's all thank sarah palin for setting us straight. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton is now about to speak. we're breaking here, breaking news. let's listen to her live. >> 1907 and 1972 and protect the civilians of libya. events have moved very quickly. so let's be clear about where we stand and how we got here. when the libyan people sough
. appreciate it. >> you bet. >>> in japan, americas are being urged to get supplies of iodine tablets. the very latest on the dangerous nuclear reactors. a full update after this. [ male announcer ] this is charlie whose morning flight to london starts with arthritis pain... and a choice. take tylenol now, and maybe up to 8 in a day. or...choose aleve and 2 pills for a day free of pain. enjoy the flight. you struggle to control your blood sugar. you exercise and eat right, but your blood sugar may still be high, and you need extra help. ask your doctor about onglyza, a once daily medicine used with diet and exercise to control high blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. adding onglyza to your current oral medicine may help reduce after meal blood sugar spikes and may help reduce high morning blood sugar. [ male announcer ] onglyza should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. tell your doctor if you have a history or risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. onglyza has not been studied with insulin. using onglyza with medicines such as sulfonylureas may cause low blood sugar.
reactors at japan's krip crippled nuclear plant temperature. they say there is still a lot of work to be done before electricity can be turned on. emergency crews dumped 18 tons of seawater into a nearly boiling pool holding spent nuclear fuel. japan's nikkei market closed with more than a 4% gain today thanks to the good news at the power plant. the index is still 7% lower than its close the day the earthquake and tsunami hit. >>> crews recovered the body of taylor anderson, an american teaching english in miyagi, japan, believed to be the first american victim, the first known one of the quake and tsunami. they estimate miyagi prefecture lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan is live now in seoul, south of korea. what's the story now? what's the situation with fear and whether it is dissipating in that region? >> reporter: i think there is still a lot of fear, it depends on where you are. if you are talking in the north, you are still focused so much on the search and rescue effort. it is still officially search and rescue. they go through the rebel with sticks trying their best
're expecting that announcement at 3:00 eastern time. >>> still touch and go at japan's nuclear power plant, but they're still structure ally sound. smoke started rising from reactor numbers two and three. the smoke eventually stopped. the plant operator says it's not clear what started the smoke in the first place. >>> the just is making potassium iodide to u.s. personnel in tokyo and abu ghraib, trophy pictures of soldiers posing with bodies of afghan civiliance. what possibly could the military say to explain it? >>> plus it's a list no parent wants to see their teen's name on. and the latest case of cyber bullying. >>> a dramatic rescue of an entire family including a six month old puppy. [ sneezes ] allergies? you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange
at some point. thank you, william bratton for joiningus. >> can japan import enough bottled water to ease fears of nuclear contamination? >>> open court. chris brown says he's sorry about his latest outburst, but could his morning meltdown land him behind bars? >>> time for the "your business" entrepreneur of the week. beach volley players turned their passion into a year-round activity. they created the sand box in mystic, connecticut, the only indoor volleyball facility in new england. they're attracting players around the reege to this unique concept. watch "your business" sunday mornings 7:30 on msnbc. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] with amazing innovation, driven by relentless competition, wireless puts the world at your command. ♪ wireless puts the world at your command. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [scraping] [piano keys banging] [scraping] [horns honking] iteelie's holdyourarack. let me guess, 16. [laughing] yeeah. that's why there's castrol gtx... w
much. >> thank you, andrea. >>> now to the latest to the crisis in japan. police there say the official death toll now has reached 9,800 people. 17,500 people still remain missing. two workers are trying to stabilize the fukushima nuclear power plant, two of those workers were injured when they stepped into radioactive water and were hospitalized, but authorities say that they were exposed to levels below the maximum allowed for plant workers. >>> the u.s. military has more than 19,000 marines and sailors, 20 ships, 140 aircrafts assisting with relief efforts in japan. and in a surprise move, north korea is helping out as well. kim jong-il has sent $500,000 million for relief for ethnic koreans living in japan. >>> today, tokyo's drinking water has been deemed safe again, a day after radiation levels sent many scrambling for bottled water. but some of the neighboring communities around tokyo are now reporting increased radiation levels. nbc' lee cowan is live for us in so seoul, south korea. the improvement, a day forward -- one step forward, two steps back. it seems not only the radiat
to unbelievable military support of the situation in japan, ongoing effort, obviously in afghanistan and our ongoing effort to wind down the war in iraq, we thought it was much more important rather than sit by and watch the slaughter of these innocents, to bring along is the international community. we didn't wait to see where the international community was, we brought them along. now we have an opportunity to press for the kind of opportunity for 9 opposition that i think they're looking for and they're taking. >> denis, i just want to nail something down, you fellows, people in the administration led by the president, with the guidance of the people around him, including the secretary of state and others, you believed gadhafi was going to do what he said. he was using terms like disinfected germs, go house by house, you believed he would do that on a mass basis? >> well, there certainly was a lot of evidence to suggest as much, chris, and given the history of this country and the great things that we have done to protect innocents and various instances across history and across the globe
't drink the water. japan warns parents that radiation levels in tap water is dangerous for infants in tokyo. >>> health care one year later. the fifth grader turned activist who was with president obama when he signed the landmark law, joins us. >>> and -- >> doesn't seem fair. what i feel, what you felt long ago, when i was very young, i could say to myself this was how love was. >> the death of a hollywood legend. elizabeth taylor dies from congestive heart failure at the age of 79. we will talk exclusively with her sixth husband, former u.s. senator, john warner. >>> and good day, everyone, i'm andrea mitchell, live in washington. we begin with developing news out of jerusalem today. israeli officials report that one woman now has died after a bomb tore through the crowd at a bus stop in the center of jerusalem. dozens of people were injured in the explosion, labeled a terrorist attack by israeli police. the city is on high alert. the entrance to jerusalem has been closed. michael oren is israel's ambassador to the united states and joins me now. first of all, our condolences. t
of "operation odyssey dawn" in just a few minutes. >>> but in japan today, an amazing rescue more than a week -- police say a 16-year-old boy and his 80-year-old grandmother have been rescued, and the two were found alive in the miyagi prefecture. >>> and new this hour, officials say 2 of the 6 reactor units are safely under control after the storage pools have cooled down. >>> this is the japanese coast guard riding that wave. it was about three miles or so off the country, just after the 9.0 quake. >>> robert bazzell is following -- i know we have the survivors and some great pictures of them being airlifted to safety. can you tell me if that news is getting out widespread and what the reaction is to that? >> reporter: well, it's certainly getting widespread. it's on japanese television all the time and in the newspapers. how much that's going to make people feel better after many thousands have died and hundreds of thousands are homeless, i don't know, but one piece of uplifting news in a very dismal situation. >> how about in terms of dismal situations the damage to the reactors and conse
so much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> and when we come back, radiation fears in japan. a tap water warning issues for infants in tokyo. >>> and the world loses a lenl jend. we look at the life of dame elizabeth taylor as colorful off screen as it was on. homeowners -- rates have been going up, but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com. plus, get the best deal or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. her morning begins with arthritis pain. that's a coffee and two pills. the afternoon tour begins with more pain and more pills. the evening guests arrive. back to sore knees. back to more pills. the day is done but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. just 2 pills can keep arthritis pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is lara who chose 2 aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief of aleve in liquid gels. you struggle to control your blood sugar. you exercise and eat right, but your blood sugar may still be high, and you need extra help. ask your doctor about onglyza, a once
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)